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Nagraj Adve

Inside Antarctica: the continent whose fate will affect millions

From Financial Times: Antarctica is changing fast, including sections of the massive ice sheet that covers it. This holds so much water that if it ever melted completely, global sea levels would rise by nearly 60m. The race to understand Antarctica has become more urgent. Also watch, the documentary ‘The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning.’

In a Bengal school swallowed by the sea, a lesson for the world

When a group of us visited Boatkhali Kadambini Primary School four years ago, classes were on in full swing. This primary school is at one edge of Sagar island in the Sunderbans. That entire stretch, including the Boatkhali school, has now been swallowed up by the sea, including the house in which we had stayed.

In the eye of Hurricane Irma lie the fingerprints of global warming – and inequality

From The Wire: The recent hurricanes have made some raise an obvious question: to what extent does global warming have a role to play? To which I would add one voiced less frequently: why should those least responsible for global warming have to constantly face its effects? And what does it bode for the future?

Nagraj Adve: When the floods hit

From Jacobin Magazine: Increasingly, extreme weather events including the annual floods are being recognized as the new normal. Less commonly noted is how this “new normal” tends to disproportionately hit the underclasses—the urban poor, agriculturalists, coastal communities, and poor women. In short, the greatest victims of global warming will be those least responsible for it.

One of the biggest icebergs in recorded history just broke loose from Antarctica

The Washington Post reports: Scientists have announced that a much-anticipated break at the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica has occurred, unleashing a massive iceberg that is more than 2,200 square miles in area and weighs a trillion tons. Also, Nagraj Adve on why India must heed the cracking of this Haryana-sized Antarctic ice shelf.

Why India must heed the cracking of a Haryana-sized ice shelf in Antarctica

In West Antarctica, a huge ice shelf called Larsen C has developed a rift 175 kilometres long and half-a-kilometre wide, which could soon set loose an iceberg the size of Haryana, at over 5,000 sq. km. We need to pay more attention because it could potentially gravely impact India in the near and long term.

Trump or no, climate change action will take a beating from long-term economic forces anyway

Nagraj Adve writes: In any economy primed to continuously expand, technological improvements alone can only help so much. While being stunned by Trump’s victory, let’s neither underestimate  nor render invisible the inherent, long-term economic tendencies that prevent greenhouse-gas emissions worldwide from declining as the science demands they should. In fact, they may well rise again.

Nationalists take note – its nature that draws borders, not nation-states

If any of us have fixed geographical notions of the nation-state, the rise and fall of sea levels everywhere ought to give us pause. Not just in warnings about the future, but also lessons from the past. Once, England and France were contiguous landmass… our borders are drawn not by us, but by the oceans.

NEWS UPDATE #76 (Climate special)

Lekha Sridhar writes: The picture that emerges is of India demanding climate justice from an unrepentant West, which happily belched out carbon emissions for centuries and now does not want to allow developing countries their fair share of the carbon space. However, the Indian media should steer clear from lionising India’s rhetoric on climate change.

Climate Change Brought the Rains, Our ‘Development’ Brought the Chaos

Chennai experienced exceptionally heavy rainfall in 1969, 1976, 1985, 1996, 1998, 2005 and now in 2015. Even a decadal frequency is higher than the occurrence of extreme rain events in the first half of the 20th century. It’s likely that at least some of these six extreme rain events had the fingerprint of climate change.

Nagraj Adve on climate change and species migration

These migrants need attention, too When species shift northward or higher, not all in an ecosystem may move, disrupting the interconnectedness that has evolved over decades Nagraj Adve, The Hindu Our fish are moving north. Until about the mid-1980s, important fish species such as mackerel and oil sardines used to be present no further north

New issue of Mausam, India’s only Climate Change journal

India Climate Justice The latest issue of Mausam, the e-mag published by India Climate Justice, is out. Here’s the list of contents: CONTENTS Experiencing the Change: Climate Change and Everyday Life in Coffee Plantations of South India Anshu Ogra Human Trafficking and Climate Disasters Sayantoni Datta Betting on the Wrong Horse: Fast Reactors and Climate Change MV

Video: The Third Curve interviews by Mansoor Khan

Author and filmmaker Mansoor Khan has been doing a series of short video interviews with experts in various fields from ecology to energy to economics. The interviews take off from the themes covered in his book, The Third Curve: The End of Growth. As We Know It!. Some of the prominent names interviewed so far are

News update

Could Fighting Global Warming Be Cheap and Free? Paul Krugman, The New York Times In his latest column, well-known NYT columnist Krugman attacks, among others, the Post Carbon Institute, a leading think tank on Peak Oil and Climate Change, as wrong-headed and inducing “climate despair”.  In a piece titled Paul Krugman’s Errors and Omissions the Post Carbon Institute’s Richard